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How Virtual Reality tricks your brain into believing that you are somewhere else?

Updated: Jan 17, 2023

Virtual reality (VR) is an immersive technology that uses computer-generated imagery to create a simulated environment. When you use a VR headset, your brain is tricked into thinking that you are experiencing the simulated environment as if it were real.


But how does VR trick your brain into believing that you are somewhere else? Here are a few key ways that VR technology is able to create this illusion:


Visual immersion

One of the most important ways that VR tricks your brain is by creating a fully immersive visual experience. VR headsets use high-resolution displays and special lenses to create a sense of depth and perspective, making it feel as if you are looking at a real scene rather than a flat screen.


Audio immersion

Sound is an important part of the VR experience, and many VR headsets come equipped with spatial audio technology that can simulate sounds coming from different directions. This can help create a sense of presence and make it feel as if you are actually in the simulated environment.


Visual immersion

Many VR systems also use haptic feedback, which is the use of touch or force to communicate with the user. This can include vibrations, pressure, or resistance, which can help create a more realistic and immersive experience.


Spatial tracking

VR systems often use sensors and other technologies to track the movements of your head and body. This allows the simulated environment to change in real-time as you move around, helping to create a sense of presence and immersion.


Overall, VR is able to trick your brain into believing that you are somewhere else by creating a fully immersive sensory experience. By using high-resolution visuals, spatial audio, haptic feedback, and spatial tracking, VR is able to create an illusion of reality that can be extremely convincing

The ultimate goal of virtual reality is not the technology itself, but rather the experiences and possibilities it enables." - Jeremy Bailenson, Founding Director of the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab

 

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